Tech Tip: Classroom and Event Space Technology

Have you ever been confused about how to use the podium in a classroom? Or have you had trouble figuring out the TV in your dorm lounge? Well, the good news is that there are in-depth instructions on using these devices on our Knowledgebase! You can find instruction for using any of the podiums in any classroom, event space, or residence hall including the Dance Studio in the BSC and the M&M Mars Room. Next time you have a question, visit the Knowledgebase Classroom Technology section for help. 

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, New Student Tips, Teaching and Learning Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

Gmail Phishing Scam

Recently, Gmail has been the target of phishing scams. A user will receive an email from a fake address, but the name will be familiar. You might think it is your mom because it has her picture, but the address isn’t quite the same. That’s your first hint. Double check the email address for accuracy.

When you open the email, it will seem relatively harmless, there might not be any grammatical errors at all. There will be a link or an attachment. When you click on that link or attachment, you will be asked to login to your Gmail account again. DON’T ENTER YOUR PASSWORD! You will never have to re-login to Google. The login screen may look trustworthy. It will look almost identical to the regular page. Check the URL though. That’s not Google.

If you put your login information in, it will say error and return you to your email. That error was actually a virus infecting your computer and phishers stealing your password and information.

If you fall victim to this scam, CHANGE YOUR PASSWORD IMMEDIATELY. Also, change the password for any account that has the same or similar password. They have access to any account using that email and password. This is why ITS recommends that you use a unique password for every account.

You can report Gmail phishing scams to Google by clicking the drop-down box next to reply, and selecting “Report Phishing.” Here’s an example and how to report it.  (Hint: click the photo to enlarge it for easier viewing)

  1. First, this scammer did not even bother to double check who they were emailing. The email is not addressed correctly, and “Sheri” did not in fact receive this email.
  2. Second, the email address is unfamiliar. “Mail.com” is not a valid email server.
  3. Third, as usual the grammar, syntax, and logic gives it away.  What is this email about? What does her family oriented self have to do with city rentals?  Also, what does cityrentals have to do with badboyz?
  4. Speaking of the URL, it is http:// which is not trustworthy. Look for https:// instead.

Ultimately, this is not a trustworthy email. It was reported to Google as phishing. You can also report an email without opening it by checking the box and clicking the “!” symbol at the top. (Hint: click the photo to enlarge it for easier viewing)

Be cautious on the web and always be on the lookout for phishing scams.

As always, if you think you have received a phishing email to your E-town account, forward it to mailcop@etown.edu. If you think you have been the victim of a phishing attempt, call the ITS Helpdesk immediately at x3333 and change your password.

 

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Hover, Don’t Click

You just got an email. It looks relatively harmless, but something is nagging you. You weren’t expecting an email from your old boss, and not one like this. You remember what E-town has been telling you about phishing scams. You don’t think that in-text link is trustworthy. Check! Before you click, hover!

Links in emails can present problems in two major ways: they can be infected with malware that can damage your files, or they can be phishing attempts to gather your information for potential identity theft.  Corrupt and infected links can release malware that will automatically download onto the device as soon as you click the link. When malware is detected on the network, your account may be suspended. This can take some time to resolve. Don’t put yourself at that risk.

A phishing link might also redirect to a page that asks for your username and password or other information. It may look trustworthy, but giving account information to phishers could lead to identity theft. Phishers can use this information and put the entire E-town network at risk.

Never click on a link in an email. An in-text link, or hyperlink, uses a word or phrase instead of showing the URL. For example, the link might say “Go to Google and search for cats wearing hats” with Google linked instead of displaying the URL.

To tell if that in-text link is trustworthy, hover your mouse over the link, but don’t click yet. By hovering over the link, the destination will appear. This allows you to check if the destination is what you expect.

Give it a try. Hover over this link: “Go to Google and search for cats wearing hats.” Did you see what we did there? If this were a phishing attack, you would have been in danger. Because you didn’t click and hovered instead, your computer and account are safe.

If you are using a phone or mobile device, you can tap and hold on a link until an options window appears. The link will appear at the top of that options window where you can confirm the destination of that link. See an example of that options window on an iPhone below:

Before you follow a link, examine it VERY carefully. Is the whole address, especially the extension at the end, correct? Perhaps you thought it would go to “etown.edu” but really it says that it will go to “etown.edu.co.” That is not the same place, and that is a common sign of a phishing scam. If it is going where it said it is, then you are safe to paste that URL into your web browser and follow the link. If it goes somewhere else, do NOT open the link. It might be a phishing scam.

If you think you have received a phishing email, forward it to mailcop@etown.edu. If you think you have been the victim of a phishing attempt, call the ITS Helpdesk immediately at X3333 and change your password.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tech Tip: Office 365 and OneDrive

Do you have a group project this semester? Well, an easy way for the whole to group edit a single document is to use Office 365. Login to your individual OneDrive using your E-town credentials, and share the document with your group members at the E-town emails. With OneDrive, you can all edit the same document on separate computers in real time. No waiting, and it automatically saves the document for you every time you make a change. OneDrive is also an easy way to store files in the cloud to access on any computer on or off campus. For more information on logging in, sharing documents, or using Office OneDrive, read our Knowledgebase articles. 

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Phishing Scams on Social Media, Text, and the Phone

Personal information threats don’t just come through email anymore. We’ve seen attempts coming through social media scams, text messages (smishing), and phone calls (vishing). These malicious frauds attempt to gain access to your account usernames and passwords, bank account information, credit card numbers, and other such personally identifiable information (PII). Most of the attacks seen on campus are still of the phishing variety, but it’s important to be aware of other potential threats. And keep in mind – your best line of defense is to use your common sense, and be wary of everything.

We all know not to send the African Prince our bank account information via email, but what about a friend stranded in an airport messaging you on Facebook? Believe it or not, this could be phishing too. So, what do you do?

Don’t click! Verify.

Do some research. Did that person post anything recently on Facebook about leaving for a trip or returning from a trip? If they posted just that morning about cuddling with their dog all day, then odds are they aren’t in Fiji at the moment. If you can’t find anything, then try texting, calling, or emailing this person. Avoid replying to the Facebook message. The phisher could use that to target you next.

Report.

If you are pretty sure that this is a phishing message, let the victim know. They should change their password immediately. Remind them to let others know this message was a scam before some poor soul falls victim to the scam. Next, report the message or post. Most social media platforms have an option to report a post for spam content. This will not hurt your friend; it will only let the social media platform know to check their security and protect your friend’s account.

What if it’s over text?

SMS phishing (smishing) will likely be easy to spot. Here’s a hint, don’t believe any of it. If it comes from a number you don’t recognize, then it’s probably not a message you want to open. Check to see:

  • Is the website link misspelled or suspicious?
  • Does it use a hidden link such as a bit.ly link?
  • Is it vague and nonspecific?
  • Are there spelling or grammatical errors?

Don’t click! Don’t respond!

Some hacker may include the familiar “Text STOP to stop receiving messages.” This may be another way to make them look more reliable. However, it can make you and your phone vulnerable. It is best to delete the message. If the spammer lures you in pretending to be your bank, call your bank with a number you trust. When you can, they can check if there is a problem with your account.

Talking about a trusted number…

Phishing scams can come over the phone too (vishing). A common scam you may have heard of is the “IRS calling.” Don’t give anyone your SSN number or any sensitive information over the phone without verifying their identity! The scammer may seem legitimate, but they may have stolen information about you from your social media platform to sound more convincing. Search for the number with a reverse phone lookup app or White Pages. Often there will be record of an IRS phone number, or more likely the spammer will have been reported under that number already.

Ignore it.

Lastly, if you’re ever in doubt, just ignore it. Your bank will call again. The IRS will send you a letter. Your friend will make it home from Fiji safely. That too good to be true vacation will probably never happen. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

Adapted from: http://www.techrepublic.com/article/infographic-how-to-identify-and-avoid-phishing-attacks/

Enjoy this brief video from Microsoft Safer Online on the importance of internet safety

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Posted in Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Chrome Apps Faculty Will Love

If one of your New Year’s Resolutions was to be more organized, get more work done, and finally finish your research or book, then these Chrome Extensions might be perfect for you and your students.

Distraction-free viewing

Mercury Reader (formerly Readability) allows you to focus more on the task at hand without all of the distractions. Many web pages, even academic ones, are filled with distractions like ads or recommendations. To avoid all of that, download the Mercury Reader extension. Whenever you find yourself on a distracting webpage, click the rocket ship in the toolbar to remove anything that doesn’t belong. This will leave you with the main content including videos, photos, or links in the article just minus the annoying ads.

Built-in break times

Even as an adult, procrastination and distraction is a problem. Pinterest and social media creep into your work time, and before you know it your office hours are over before you’ve even gotten any work done. With Strict Workflow, you can block those distracting websites to force you to stay on task. This chrome extension acts like a temporary parental block on your chrome. The app reminds you to remain patient and stay on task until your break time. Then you can visit your distractions for a little while before going back to work.

Sticky notes galore

Do you always lose your planner? Do you have tons of sticky notes posted all over your desk? You should get Note Board, the electronic alternative to pen and paper to-do lists. With Note Board, you can create different boards and create tons of notes to keep yourself organized. You can even set reminders right in the extension.  You can keep track of your research notes, your To-Do list, and your grocery list all in one place.

As a professor, sometimes the best way to make your life easier is to make your students’ lives easier. Recommend these three apps to your students to help them study more efficiently or to get through that difficult article with ease.

Study and procrastinate at the same time

With Memorize! your students can create questions and answers, like flashcards to appear at preset intervals. Every five to fifteen minutes the extension will ask a random question from a list questions the student creates. If they answer the question right, and they can go back to their browser. Answer wrong, and they will be given a single letter hint. The app makes them keep guessing until they answer it correctly.

Study Smarter

Your students will never be late turning in an assignment again with My Study Life. This Chrome extension allows your students to create and manage their schedule and all of their assignments and tasks. The app will remind them daily about upcoming due dates, classes, exams, and tasks. If you know someone who has trouble keeping track of everything and sticky notes aren’t working, recommend that try this to finally get organized.

Finally, a dictionary

Who hasn’t wished for a dictionary when they were reading a particularly wordy article? With the Google Dictionary extension, your students can click on any word to view a definition, synonym, or translation. This could revolutionize your research experience and help your students work through a lengthy article without all of the trouble.

With these Chrome Extensions, this semester could go a lot smoother for your and your students. Make Chrome your Valentine this year and download one or all of these extensions.

 

Adapted from Karrar Haider and originally posted on https://www.maketecheasier.com/best-chrome-extensions-for-students/.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , ,

Xfinity on Campus!

It’s here. It’s finally here! Xfinity on Campus is officially a reality!

Why are we so excited?

Our contract with Comcast includes a subscription to Xfinity on Campus for Residential Students. This means that students have free access to Xfinity products while connected to the campus network

You can login to xfinityoncampus.com and watch live TV, stream your old favorites, and even record shows to watch later. While this subscription does not include access to premium channels like HBO or Showtime, you can purchase subscriptions to those directly through the Xfinity On Campus website.

How do you take advantage of this amazing opportunity?

First, navigate to XfinityOnCampus.com while connected to the campus Secure Wi-Fi. When prompted, enter Elizabethtown College as your School Name and press enter. This will take you to a login page. You should login with your E-town username and network password. Click Start Watching, and agree to the Terms of Activation. Add a descriptive name of your device. This will help you find your device later when you login. We recommend using your network username to avoid forgetting it. Click continue after you have named your device. This will take you to the Xfinity streaming site.

If you need a hand, be sure to stop by the Xfinity information table in the BSC concourse on Wednesday, February 15th, from 11:00 – 3:00. The representatives will help you get your account set up, and have some great giveaways too! Enjoy!

For more information, refer to our Knowledgebase article, Xfinity On Campus.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, New Student Tips, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Zoom Web Conferencing

All campus staff and faculty now have access to Zoom Web Conferencing.  Zoom is replacing WebEx as our web conferencing solution.

What is Zoom and what can you do with it? 

Connect with anyone with an internet connection from PC, Mac, tablet or phone.

  • Talk via phone or integrated audio via computer (VoIP).
  • Text chat with attendees.
  • Share your device screen, including audio.
  • See attendees via webcam.
  • Schedule meetings in advance and invite attendees via Outlook or other email program.
  • Record a meeting locally or on the web and share link with others for later viewing.

If you previously used WebEx, rest assured that Zoom has all of the same features, but it is much easier to use and connecting to the audio is seamless.  It is also a more stable and feature-rich solution than Skype. You will quickly see why we made this switch…video is crisp and audio is clear.

If you haven’t used a web conference tool before, why should you check out Zoom?

  • No more snow makeup days. Simply web conference your class from your home.
  • Students can attend class from anywhere.
  • Guest speakers can speak to your class even if they can’t make it to campus.
  • Your committee can still meet even if everyone can’t be on campus.
  • You can teach an online class with live, synchronous sessions.
  • You can interview candidates for a new position without having everyone travel to campus.

Everyone can get a free Basic Zoom account by visiting https://etown.zoom.us and logging in with your E-town credentials.

What do you get with a Basic account?

  • Unlimited 1:1 meetings
  • 40 minute meetings with up to 50 attendees
  • Audio via computer (VoIP) or toll phone number
  • Unlimited local recording

We have a limited number of Pro accounts that can be enabled as needed. To learn more about the differences between the Basic and Pro plan, visit: https://zoom.us/pricing.  If you need a Pro account, contact Linda Macaulay and include the dates the Pro account is needed.

Check out the Getting Started materials or attend a live training session. Consider how Zoom can enhance teaching, learning, and business practices here on our campus.

Contact Linda Macaulay with any questions.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Teaching and Learning, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

2017 New Year, New You!

Seven tech things to think about in 2017.

  1. Update your computer. Not only is the new year a time for changes in your life, it’s a time for changes in your technology. It’s a fantastic time to update your computer. Make sure to back up your computer, update your software, and scan for malware. Find out how to do these and more for PC and Mac!
  2. Be conscious of fake news articles. The epidemic of fake news stories on Facebook has been gathering attention over the past year. Stories have grown increasingly overblown as a result of this divisive election, and information can be passed extremely quickly through Facebook. Don’t fall victim to these exaggerated or outright falsified stories. Take everything with a grain of salt. Just because a site looks official doesn’t mean that it’s a reliable source of news. Fact check before you spread inaccurate information!
  3. Watch the type of content you post online. Speaking of Facebook, it’s important to remember that everything posted on social media is on social media forever. Despite the ability to delete posts, nothing is ever permanently erased from the internet. The best way to deal with this is simply don’t post anything that you don’t want to be forever memorialized. Complaints about your boss? Offensive “jokes?” Illegal activities? All of this things can come back to bite you in the future.
  4. Proofread your emails. Not only is the internet permanent, its forms of text-based communications aren’t particularly nuanced. Emails are prone to misunderstandings that could have been cleared up immediately in person. What you think is a simple request might have come off as rude or assuming. What you meant as a slight suggestion might have been taken as unwanted criticism. Don’t just dash off an email and send it, give it a brief proofreading to make sure it’s courteous and professional.
  5. Lower your “phone voice.” Too many of us have been in the same room with that person who is talking loudly on their phone. People’s “phone voices” are often louder than their normal voices. If you must speak on the phone, try to find a private or out-of-the-way place where you won’t be negatively affecting anyone around you.
  6. Save your phone battery. Does your cell phone’s battery seem to be dying constantly? Try turning down the brightness on your screen. This simple and effective trick can save you a surprising amount of battery power. A screen turned up to full brightness is unneeded and power-sapping.
  7. Be aware of phishing and other scams. One topic to never forget about is cyber security. As soon as one scam is dismantled, it seems that two appear to take its place. Remember to keep your passwords private, and never enter them on unfamiliar websites. Check out this article about Phishing for more information.

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Chrome Extensions You’ll Love – Happy Valentine’s Day!

If one of your New Year’s Resolutions was to be a better student, procrastinate less, or be more organized then these Chrome Extensions are for you.

Distraction-free viewing

Mercury Reader (formerly Readability) allows you to focus more on the task at hand without all of the distractions. Many webpages, even academic ones, are filled with distractions like ads or recommendations. To avoid all of that, download the Mercury Reader extension. Whenever you find yourself on a distracting webpage, click the rocket ship in the toolbar to remove anything that doesn’t belong. This will leave you with the main content including videos, photos, or links in the article just minus the annoying ads.

Built-in break times

Everyone knows that the lure of Facebook, Netflix, and even Pinterest can turn an hour of studying into six hours of no studying. With Strict Workflow, you can block those distracting websites to force you to study. This chrome extensions acts like a temporary parental block on your chrome. The app reminds you to remain patient and stay on task until your break time. Then you can visit your distractions for a little while before going back to studying.

Study and procrastinate at the same time

With Memorize! you can create questions and answers, like flashcards to appear at preset intervals. Every five to fifteen minutes the extension will ask you a random question from your list. Get the question right, and you can go back to your browser. Answer wrong, and you will be given a single letter hint. Keep guessing until you answer it correctly to make the window disappear. At least until the next question.

Sticky notes galore

Do you always lose your planner? Do you have tons of sticky notes posted all over your desk? You should get Note Board, the electronic alternative to pen and paper to-do lists. With Note Board, you can create different boards and create tons of notes to keep yourself organized. You can even set reminders right in the extension.

Study smarter

Never be late turning in an assignment with My Study Life. This Chrome extension allows you to create and manage your schedule as well as all of your assignments and tasks. The app will remind you daily about upcoming due dates, classes, exams, and tasks. If you have trouble keeping track of everything and sticky notes aren’t working, try this and finally get organized.

And a dictionary

Who hasn’t wished for a dictionary when they were reading a particularly wordy article? With the Google Dictionary extension, you can click on any word to view a definition, synonym, or translation. This could revolutionize your research experience.

With these Chrome Extensions, this semester could go a lot smoother and help you keep that New Year’s Resolution. Make Chrome your Valentine this year and download one or all of these extensions.

 

Adapted from Karrar Haider and originally posted on Make Tech Easier.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, New Student Tips, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Tech Tip: Device Issues? Turn it off and back on again. Really.

When your computer acts up or apps stop responding or your Wi-Fi won’t connect, don’t panic.  The easiest thing to try and fix any technology device issue is to turn the device off and then back on again. No, really. This does work. Rebooting can fix a number of issues. Sometimes a device glitches such as the Wi-Fi not connecting, an application not acting right, or the computer simply acting slow. An easy fix is to turn the device off and back on again. This works for desktop computers, laptops, tablets, game consoles, and phones. Rebooting also helps with wireless routers at home too.

Rebooting resets the device and starts reading the code from the beginning. Like tired students, sometimes the computer just loses its place or something gets messed up like when you get one bubble off on the Scantron and nothing is right.

Next time your device is acting up, try restarting it before you start to panic. Close the application (like Firefox or Word) and open it again. If that doesn’t fix the problem, try turning the entire device off and turning it back on. If that doesn’t work, give us a call at the Helpdesk at x3333, email us at helpdesk@etown.edu, or stop by and let us take a look in Nicarry 125.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Office 2016, Web Tips, Windows 10 Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Subscribe to us!

Do you enjoy reading our content? You should subscribe to the ITS Blog! We’ll send you one email weekly about the content that we posted that week. You can stay updated on what we post without having to wait for the Newsletter each month. Plus, you can read all of the awesome content that doesn’t get sent in the Newsletter. *GASP* You mean to say that not everything is included in the IT Matters Newsletter? YES! Don’t miss out on anything! Subscribe to the blog today!

Simply go to the ITS Blog, type your email address into the box, and click subscribe! Easy as 1,2,3.
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Posted in Digital Citizenship, Home Page, New Student Tips, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , ,

PS4 Wi-Fi Broadcasting

Playstations can broadcast a Wi-Fi signal when they do not have an internet connection in order to play multiplayer online or Remote Play. Our network does not support broadcasted Wi-Fi signals. You must turn this function off when you are on campus. Game systems can connect to Guest Wi-Fi if their IP address is registered with ITS. Make sure you register your device with the registration form before attempting to connect to the Wi-Fi.

To turn off Remote Play and Wi-Fi Broadcasting, you have to uncheck Enable Remote Play so that it is disabled. This will stop broadcasting a Wi-Fi signal. For step-by-step instructions, visit the Knowledgebase article on Playstation 4.

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It’s Time to Change Your Password

Welcome back to campus! It’s that time of year again. Classes are starting and passwords need to be changed! It is best to change your password occasionally to maintain security for your account.

When you change your password, it must be at least 8 characters long and contain:

  • 1 uppercase letter
  • 1 lowercase letter
  • 1 number
  • 1 special character (!@#$ etc.)

By following these rules, your password will be stronger, and when all of the network passwords are strong then our entire network is safer.

You can change your password from the Outlook Web App (mail.etown.edu) by following these steps:

  1. Sign in.
  2. Click the gear in the top right hand corner.
  3. Select Options.
  4. Expand the General tab on the left.
  5. Select My account (it will be the first option).
  6. Click the Change your password link. It is located right above the Mailbox Usage in the bottom right.

For detailed instructions, visit our Knowledgebase article on Changing Your Network Password.

After you change your password, remember to update the password anywhere you might have it saved including in web browsers (although we do not recommend this practice).

You no longer need to update your password to connect to the Wi-Fi with your mobile devices. This now happens automatically when you reset your email password. Nice, huh?

If you have any questions, feel free to stop by the ITS Helpdesk in Nicarry 125. You can also email us at helpdesk@etown.edu or call us at x3333.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , ,

Recent Updates to Canvas – January 2017

There are several awesome enhancements to Canvas for the beginning of the Spring semester. Watch this short video to learn more.

https://www.screencast.com/t/gaFYBkYoZH

 

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Posted in Canvas, Home Page