Changes to the Ticket System

A recent upgrade to the Ticket System has slightly changed the appearance and process for creating and updating tickets. The primary change is to the updating process, but the display is slightly different for each aspect.

Update a Ticket

If you have information to add to an existing ticket, you can add content but you have to click the plus sign to add the note before choosing Save at the bottom of the ticket.

 

 

Create a Ticket

You can still create a ticket for support from the ITS Help Desk by signing in at https://helpdesk.etown.edu/helpdesk/WebObjects/Helpdesk.woa or by clicking the “Submit a Help Desk Ticket” option on the ITS webpage (https://www.etown.edu/offices/its/). More details about how to create a ticket can be found on this post.

Check a Ticket

Once you’ve signed in to the Ticket System, you can click the “History” tab at the top of the webpage to view all of your open tickets and select the one you would like to view.

As always, you can contact the Help Desk directly at helpdesk@etown.edu or 717-361-3333 for creating, updating, and checking the status of your ticket.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Home Page, Training, Windows 10 Tagged with: , , ,

Ransomware Infections on the Rise – COVID-19

We recently received the following information via an announcement from our anti-virus software provider Cisco AMP for Endpoints:

The Cisco AMP for Endpoints research team has observed increasing incidences of malicious activity culminating in ransomware. These incidents often begin with phishing emails containing a malicious attachment, malicious link to a website, or drive-by downloads of exploitation against vulnerable software, all of which could lead to the execution of ransomware.

Let’s work together to reduce the possible attacks on the Etown network.

Remember to look for these things in email messages to help recognize scams:

  • External message banner – Messages pretending to be from an etown.edu email address but only spoofing the address will have a “CAUTION: External message…” banner at the top of the email message.
  • From address – Review the sender’s email address at the top of the message to confirm the real address that sent it.
  • Links to websites – Never click a website link in an email message unless you are certain it is safe and directing you to the correct website. Hover over the link in the message to see where the link will send you.
  • Attachments – Never open an attachment from a sender that you aren’t expecting. If you aren’t sure if it’s legitimate, contact the sender for confirmation.

If you think you’ve received a phishing attempt:

  • Use the Phish Alert Button in Outlook to report the message
  • If you don’t see the Phish Alert Button, forward the message to mailcop@etown.edu and delete it
  • Don’t open the message, click on any links, or respond in any manner

If you haven’t already done so, enroll in Multi-Factor Authentication which will help protect your account from being used by a hacker. Our best defense against phishing attempts, malware, ransomware and all the other attempts by hackers to gain access to the Etown network is you! Paying additional attention to your email today can save loss of data and untold hours of cleanup later.

As always, contact the ITS Help Desk (717-361-3333 or helpdesk@etown.edu) with any questions about your cybersecurity. Be well!

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Posted in Computer Tips, Cybersecurity, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Training, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Fake Charity Websites – COVID-19

KnowBe4, our partner in cybersecurity, have provided suggestions and resources for keeping your accounts safe in these uncertain times. This post, and all of those in this series, are taken directly from their website.

Fake charity websites:

There has been a recent increase in the number of email accounts and websites that appear to be owned by organizations asking for charitable contrbutions for studies, doctors, and victims who have been affected by the coronavirus. Scammers often create fake charity email accounts and websites after global disasters or pandemics like the COVID-19 outbreak.

If you want to make a charitable donation, go to the charity website of your choice to submit your payment. Type the charityʼs web address in your browser instead of clicking on any links in emails or other messages.

If you’ve received an email and are concerned about the legitimacy, you can report the email to ITS. Use the Phish Alert Button in your email to report the message. Don’t see the Phish Alert Button? Forward the message to mailcop@etown.edu.

 

And, contact the ITS Help Desk (717-361-3333 or helpdesk@etown.edu) with any questions about your cybersecurity. Be well!

 

Information from KnowBe4: 248_-_Scam_Alert_Coronavirus_-_ENGB_210x700mm_V1 (1).pdf

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Posted in Computer Tips, Cybersecurity, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Training, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Phishing Scams – Fake Safety Information – COVID-19

KnowBe4, our partner in cybersecurity, have provided suggestions and resources for keeping your accounts safe in these uncertain times. This post, and all of those in this series, are taken directly from their website.

Phishing scams – Fake safety information:

The last few weeks have shown an increase in phishing scams that appear to come from organizations such as the CDC (Centers for Disease Control) or the WHO (World Health Organization). The scammers have crafted emails that appear to come from these sources, but they actually contain malicious phishing links or dangerous attachments.There are also emails that claim to have a “new” or “updated” list of cases of Coronavirus in our area. These emails contain dangerous links.

Don’t forget to hover over the links in the email messages to confirm the web addresses. If you’re not certain, forward the message using the Phish Alert Button in your email. Don’t see the Phish Alert Button? Forward the message to mailcop@etown.edu. Remember the best solution for finding information from these sites is to type the URL for the source in your browser, don’t rely on links in messages.

And, contact the ITS Help Desk (717-361-3333 or helpdesk@etown.edu) with any questions about your cybersecurity. Be well!

 

Information from KnowBe4: 248_-_Scam_Alert_Coronavirus_-_ENGB_210x700mm_V1 (1).pdf.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Cybersecurity, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Training, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Phishing Scams – Fake Internal Communications – COVID-19

KnowBe4, our partner in cybersecurity, have provided suggestions and resources for keeping your accounts safe in these uncertain times. This post, and all of those in this series, are taken directly from their website.

Phishing scams – Fake internal communications:

These messages pretending to be from Human Resources, the IT department, or even the College President are not new to the Etown community, but have become more prevalent as we find ourselves in a new routine.

The objective of these fake internal communications is to steal your username and password. In order to access the “document” or “survey” mentioned in the email, you have to provide your credentials on a fake site. Once you’ve done that, your Office 365 account has been compromised.

Don’t forget to hover over the links in the email messages to confirm who sent them. If you’re not certain, contact the sender of the message to confirm that it’s legitimate, or use the Phish Alert Button in your email to send it to ITS for confirmation. Don’t see the Phish Alert Button? Forward the message to mailcop@etown.edu.

And, contact the ITS Help Desk (717-361-3333 or helpdesk@etown.edu) with any questions about your cybersecurity. Be well!

 

Information from KnowBe4: 248_-_Scam_Alert_Coronavirus_-_ENGB_210x700mm_V1 (1).pdf.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Cybersecurity, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Training, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Cybersecurity – COVID-19

KnowBe4, our partner in cybersecurity, have provided suggestions and resources for keeping your accounts safe in these uncertain times. This post, and the next several in this series, are taken directly from their website.

Watch out for scams!
After global phenomena, natural disasters or pandemics like COVID-19 occur, there is often an increase of opportunistic criminal activity on the internet. The bad guys are preying on your fear and sending all sorts of scams related to the Coronavirus (COVID-19).

Remain cautious! Protect yourself from scams like this:
Never click on links or open attachments from an email that you werenʼt expecting.

If you receive a suspicious email that appears to come from an official organization such as the WHO or the South African Department of Health, report the email to ITS to double check. Use the Phish Alert Button in your email to report the message. Don’t see the Phish Alert Button? Forward the message to mailcop@etown.edu.

If you want to make a charitable donation, go to the charity website of your choice to submit your payment. Type the charityʼs web address in your browser instead of clicking on any links in emails or other messages.

Finally, donʼt trust anyone knocking on your door, dressed up as a health official wanting to perform COVID-19 tests – they are just out to rob you!

And, contact the ITS Help Desk (717-361-3333 or helpdesk@etown.edu) with any questions about your cybersecurity. Be well!

 

Information from KnowBe4: 248_-_Scam_Alert_Coronavirus_-_ENGB_210x700mm_V1 (1).pdf.

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Posted in Computer Tips, Cybersecurity, Digital Citizenship, Home Page, Training, Web Tips Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Tech Tip: Multi-Factor Authentication Troubleshooting

Some users may be experiencing issues with the rollout of multi-factor authentication (MFA), especially when connecting to VPN or using mail apps other than Outlook. Here’s some common issues and how to fix them. 

First, to check your MFA settings, go to https://aka.ms/mfasetup and sign in with your E-town credentials. There, you can change your primary method of authentication, as well as setting any desired secondary ones. Make sure that you do not set up the office phone option, as MFA is not required when connected on the campus network. 

VPN users will only receive a notification sent to their primary choice. If that choice is the Authenticator app, you will not see a notification; you will need to open the app to see the code.  

If your email is set up using a native mail app (e.g., iOS’ Mail app, Android’s Mail app, Mac Mail), it may not automatically switch to MFA. To remedy this, remove the email account and re-add it. 

For additional information, including how to remove and re-add an email account, check out the ITS Knowledgebase. 

Any questions about MFA can be directed to the Help Desk at helpdesk@etown.edu or ex.3333. 

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Posted in Home Page Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Tech Tip: New Digital Signage Form

ITS’ digital signs are one of the best ways to promote your event to the campus community. Now, ITS has a new streamlined process for the submission of digital signage requests. Instead of emailing the Help Desk, you should now fill out the form on Jayweb. There is a page for students, one for faculty, and one for staff (note: you will need to be signed in to view the page). 

Signs must be requested on behalf of a department or student group. You are limited to one slide displaying at a time. Slides can only be displayed for one week. 

Make sure that your digital sign submission follows these rules, as ITS may deny your request if it does not comply. 

  • Format: 1920 x 1080 px (16:9 ratio). Images should be a .png file, and videos should be .mp4.  
  • Hierarchy: most important information at the top, details, dates, and times underneath.  
  • Background: use gradients or a solid color for readability. 
  • Font: use an easy to read font, not thin or cursive. Make sure that it shows up well against the background. 

Lastly, make sure to keep your sign simple: it should be readable in under 10 seconds. 

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Posted in Home Page Tagged with: , , , , ,

Tech Tip: VPN Authentication Method

VPN now requires multi-factor authentication (MFA) to sign in. Users should note that the code will only be sent via their primary authentication method, and not any secondary methods that have also been set up. Therefore, it is important that you make sure to have the device that the code will be sent to nearby when connecting to VPN. 

Any questions about this process can be directed to the Help Desk, at helpdesk@etown.edu or ex.3333. 

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Posted in Home Page Tagged with: , , , , , ,

What’s Multi-Factor Authentication?

In an effort to stay one step ahead of the cybercriminals, Information & Technology Services is working to provide multi-factor authentication (MFA) to protect you. Usernames and passwords are increasingly becoming a target for theft and often, the target (you) isn’t even aware of someone else accessing the account. MFA adds an additional layer of protection to your account by verifying your identity when an unknown connection is initiated. Until this verification is complete, no one can access your account, even if they know your password. 

You’ve probably already used multi-factor authentication when accessing your bank account, Gmail app, and even gaming sites. If you haven’t, here’s how it works: You enroll a device as a point of contact, when an attempt to log-in to your account from an unknown device is detected, you will receive a phone call, text message, or alert from the Microsoft Authenticator app. If the attempt is legitimate, you simply approve the request. If you weren’t trying to access your account, you decline the request and the log-in will be denied. These prompts will occur for each device attempting to connect from outside the College’s network, and each device (excluding VPN connections) can be enabled for 30 days. 

You can self-enroll in the system at any time by following the instructions in our knowledgebase. The articles provide additional information about each type of authentication and the steps to complete the process. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to the Help Desk at helpdesk@etown.edu or 717-361-3333. Thank you for your help in our testing and we appreciate your support in helping protect the College’s systems from cybercrime. 

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Posted in Digital Citizenship, Home Page Tagged with: , , , , ,

VPN Users Must Enroll in MFA

A security upgrade conducted on January 28th requires users to enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) to use VPN services. As part of this, signing into VPN now uses email credentials, rather than special VPN password. If you are already enrolled in MFA, you do not need to do anything in response to this change. If do not use MFA, you will need to enroll. You MUST enroll in MFA to use VPN; you will not be able to connect otherwise. To enroll in MFA, follow the instructions in our knowledgebase.  

Once enrolled in MFA, when a user attempts to connect to VPN, you will be prompted to enter a code sent via your chosen authentication method. You will also see these prompts when accessing your email (or other Office 365 apps) when first connecting from a new device and after 30 days since the code was entered. Note that the 30-day exemption does not apply for VPN, so you will need to enter a code each time. 

For more information on why ITS has chosen to utilize MFA, see this knowledgebase article. 

If you have any questions or concerns about this process, you can contact the Help Desk at helpdesk@etown.edu or ex.3333. 

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Posted in Home Page Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Tech Tip: iOS 13 and E-town’s Wifi

New devices running iOS 13 or later require a connection to EC_Guest_Wifi (not EC_Setup_Wifi) when the device is being setup because of a configuration change in iOS 13.

If possible, setup your device at home, then connect to E-town’s wifi when you’re on campus using the normal iOS connection instructions as detailed in this Knowledgebase article. 

If you have not previously set up your device, connect it to EC_Guest_Wifi for the setup period, then switch to EC_Setup_Wifi to connect to E-town’s wifi.

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Posted in Home Page Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Happy Holidays from Phishing Scams

Phishing is word that strikes fear in the heart of anyone concerned with cybersecurity (which should be everyone). These scams increase in frequency over the holiday season, since people are busier and less likely to carefully inspect a message to verify its legitimacy. What are the tell-tale signs of a phishing attack? 

Phishing is more than just email. Hackers may try to attack via phone call, text message, or other messaging systems too. If you don’t know who’s contacting you, or the offer seems too good to be true, stay safe and don’t respond to the bait. 

Remember the telltale signs of phishing. Does that email contain copious grammatical errors, a vague introduction that doesn’t mention your name, or an urgent message that’s scary? Does it contain an offer that seems too good to be true, or ask you to verify your password? It’s probably phishing. 

Check who sent the message. Is their email address something like universityhelpdesk@ymail.com? Or does it have an unknown domain name that doesn’t seem at all related to the place that they’re claiming to contact you from? 

Don’t be convinced because it “looks official.” Scammers are getting better and better at making a phishing attack appear to be legitimate by using real company logos and contact information. Even if an email looks like it’s real aesthetically, look carefully for signs of phishing in the actual content. Don’t react emotionally, even if the message looks scary. This is the response that the hackers want! 

Never reveal your password. Never. A message asking you to verify your password is almost certainly malicious. Remember, ITS will never ask for your password! 

Don’t open links or attachments. If the message seems to be even the faintest bit suspicious, do not open any attached links or files. This is how hackers install malware on your computer. 

When in doubt, contact and verify. Contact the person or company that the message claims to be from, be it a friend, coworker, or even a company that you regularly shop at. 

Don’t talk to strangers! That old childhood rule still applies. If you don’t know who’s calling or messaging you, be cautious. If they’re asking for personal information or making odd requests, hang up that phone and don’t do what they say. 

Don’t pick up abandoned flash drives. Cybercriminals sometimes leave flash drives with malware on them for unsuspecting victims to pick up and plug into their computer, unknowingly installing malicious programs. 

Report possible phishing to ITS. Do you think you’ve received a phishing email? Report it using the Phish Alert ButtonIf you think you may have clicked on a link that you shouldn’t have or given someone your personal information, contact the Help Desk at ex.3333 or helpdesk@etown.edu. 

  

Adapted from https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2016/11/february-2017-learn-what-it-takes-to-refuse-the-phishing-bait 

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Posted in Digital Citizenship, Home Page Tagged with: , , , , ,

VPN Connection Changes

VPN, or Virtual Private Network, allows the user to access network resources (including private and public folders) and software while off campus. The VPN system sends all traffic from your remote computer to the college’s network through an encrypted channel providing a secure method to access these resources. 

Some changes to the process of connection to VPN on college-owned Windows computer have been made this semester. You now need to select a certificate after entering your VPN username and password. Make sure to choose the certificate named admin-vpn.etown.edu or academic-vpn.etown.edu (the certificate you see will depend on the software installed on your computer). If you don’t see either of those certificates, choose the one named username@w107.etown.edu or username@w108.etown.edu. More information about this process can be found in this Knowledgebase article 

If you are using a Mac, the process has not changed.  

If you have never used VPN before but are interested in using it, you must submit a request for a VPN connectionIf you have not used VPN for a while and are interested in testing the process, or have any concerns about this process, please contact the Help Desk at helpdesk@etown.edu or ex.3333. 

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Microsoft Office on Shared Computers

At the start of this semester, ITS announced that users were now required to sign into Microsoft Office on computers in classrooms, labs and other shared environments. Some users are reporting that when attempting to sign into Office on a shared device, they see an error message which reads “You’ve reached your sign-in limit. To continue on this device, please sign out of Office on another device using your Microsoft account portal.”  

This message appears when a user is signed into Office on too many devices. Users are limited to five active devices of three different types (e.g., personal computer, phone, lab computer).  

To remedy this, make sure to not check “Stay signed in” when signing into Office, and make sure to sign out of Office before logging out of the shared machine. You can also sign out of other devices using the instructions on this Microsoft support page.  

If you have any concerns about this process, you can contact the Help Desk at helpdesk@etown.edu or 717-361-3333 (ex.3333). 

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